Archives & Special Collections News

First Editions of Twain, Hemingway Works Come to ULS!

First Editions of Twain, Hemingway Works Come to ULS!

Actor, bibliophile and philanthropist Richard E. Rauh (A&S ’62, ’64G) has donated his extraordinary collection of rare books and manuscripts valued at more than $1.4 million to the University of Pittsburgh Library System (ULS). The Rare Book Library of Richard E. Rauh will be housed in the Archives & Special Collections department of Hillman Library alongside nearly 100,000 other rare books, broadsides, pamphlets, sheet music and serials. For more information, see this PittWire story.
University of Pittsburgh Library System Acquires Additional Archives for its Horror Studies Collection

University of Pittsburgh Library System Acquires Additional Archives for its Horror Studies Collection

The University of Pittsburgh Library System (ULS) is pleased to announce several significant new acquisitions to its Horror Studies Collection.  First announced during an installment of the ULS Horror Studies Webinar Series, hosted in collaboration with Pitt’s Center for African American Poetry and Poetics (CAAPP), the ULS has acquired the papers of Linda D. Addison, the most decorated horror poet today with a total of six Bram Stoker literary awards.  Addison became the first African American writer to win a Stoker in 2001 for her collection, Consumed, Reduced to Beautiful Grey Ashes and has also received the Lifetime Achievement (2018) and Mentor of the Year (2016) Awards from the Horror Writers Association as well as the title Grand Master from the Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association (2020).  Her poetry explores themes of race, gender, loss, struggle, hope, and the resiliency of humanity through a lyrical style that employs both traditional horror tropes of the supernatural as well as stark realism.  Her archive will include drafts and manuscripts of her poetry as well as ephemera such as convention programs and awards which help demonstrate her impact on the genre.  On her hopes that her archive will inspire others, she says: “Having my writing journey from journals, through edits to final versions, become part of the University of Pittsburgh Horror Studies Collection is a dream, I never imagined, come true! To think that others, studying my process, could find value and inspiration will allow my work to safely exist past the length of my life, is an incredible blessing.” The ULS has also acquired the papers of Kathe Koja, who is a true iconoclast whose works push boundaries, expand our conceptions of horror, and prove that horror is indeed a true literary genre. Her first novel, The Cipher (1991), won both a Bram Stoker Award and Locus Award and solidified her impact as a force within new horror.  She employs a striking and unique prose style to explore themes of alienation and social isolation as well as transcendence, often through art.  Her collection will include drafts, manuscripts, and notes from her novels and short stories.  On her decision to establish her archive at the University of Pittsburgh, Koja said: “A book is its writing as well as its words: the thoughts and notes and drafts and edits (and edits, and edits) that comprise the final text. To have all that making made available for scholars, readers, and fans of horror literature is a real boon, and I'm beyond delighted that my own horror novels will now be available this way.”Lastly, the ULS has acquired the archives of the Horror Writers Association (HWA), the premiere professional organization for writers working in the genre.   This collection, established by current HWA President John Palisano with support from former President Lisa Morton, documents the history of the organization through its newsletters, convention booklets and programs, and other published materials. Collectively, these materials illustrate the work of the HWA, as well as the community it has built.  The HWA has been the main space for writers working within the genre to collect and collaborate since the late 1980s and has issued the Bram Stoker literary awards since 1987 at yearly conventions, such as the World Horror Convention and since 2016, StokerCon. Horror Studies Collection Coordinator Ben Rubin recently announced the acquisition of the HWA and Koja archives at StokerCon2021, where he participated in a live panel discussion about the archives, the potential for research, and their importance in bringing legitimacy to a genre often maligned during StokerCon along with Addison, Koja, and Palisano.  Says Rubin: “These collections represent significant steps forward in developing the horror studies collections.  They highlight the diversity of the genre, not just in its creators, but also in the ways in which it interprets, explores, and exposes the complexity of the human condition through its fears and anxieties.  Further, the HWA archives in particular serve to illustrate the strong sense of community, collaboration, and support within the horror literary community and how it has thrived”.  Processing work will begin on these new collections in summer 2021. 
Bing Crosby with the Pittsburgh Pirates

ULS acquires Bing Crosby materials

The Bing Crosby Collection, which was amassed by Crosby fan Frontis Wiggins, was recently acquired by the University Library System’s Center for American Music, housed at the Stephen Foster Memorial. The Crosby collection, which is largely material held outside of the singer’s family, includes more than 3,000 albums and CDs from recordings made from the 1920s to ‘70s, every Crosby film and television appearance, along with hundreds of books, periodicals, newspaper clippings and publications from global Bing Crosby fan clubs. The main Crosby collection is located at the singer’s alma mater, Gonzaga University in Spokane, Wash. Crosby’s childhood home in Spokane, which also is owned by Gonzaga, serves as a museum to the star.
Horror Studies - Women in Horror

Horror Studies - Women in Horror 1

Join us on Tuesday, March 9 at 7-8p.m. for a reading and conversation between two iconoclastic horror authors works challenge and expand our notions of the horror genre.  Kathe Koja and Maryse Meijer will read selections from each other’s work followed by a conversation about these selections, definitions of horror, and the relationship between influence and mentorship among different generations of writers.
Horror Studies - Women in Horror

Horror Studies - Women in Horror 2

Join us on Tuesday, March 16 at 7p.m. for a reading and conversation with acclaimed horror poet Linda D. Addison. The conversation will focus on her biography and path to success, her role as a mentor, her approach to horror and poetics and the intersection of content and style, and feature a reading and discussion of her poetry
Horror Studies - Women in Horror 3

Horror Studies - Women in Horror 3

Join us on Tuesday, April 13 at 7p.m. for a conversation with acclaimed horror authors Jewelle Gomez and Michelle Lane. The conversation will explore expanding traditional horror conventions to include marginalized communities, the intersections of inspiration and mentorship, and revisiting characters through sequels. Jewelle Gomez is an author, poet, playwright, and essayist whose work centers the experiences of LGBTQ women of color. She is the author of the groundbreaking, Lambda Award-winning novel The Gilda Stories as well as collections of stories, poetry, and essays including Don’t Explain. Michelle Lane is the author of numerous short stories and essays. Her first novel Invisible Chains was a finalist for a Bram Stoker Award.
George Romero & Pittsburgh: The Early Years Screening and Discussion

Horror Studies - "George Romero & Pittsburgh: The Early Years" Screening and Discussion

Join us on Thursday, February 4 from 7-8:30 pm for the premiere screening of the George Romero & Pittsburgh: The Early Years documentary and a special presentation of the George A. Romero Foundation Pioneer Award honoring the late Pitt alum and Night of the Living Dead star Duane Jones to be presented by Suz Romero.
It Came from the Archives! Unearthed treasures from the George A. Romero Archival Collection

Horror Studies - It Came from the Archives!

Join Horror Studies Collection Coordinator Ben Rubin and Visiting Researcher Adam Hart on Tuesday, February 9 from 7-8 pm as they discuss their favorite and most significant discoveries from processing the George A. Romero Archival Collection. Join as they will show off rare and never before seen materials that will shed new light onto his classic films as well as reveal the films that could have been through unfinished and lost projects.
Beyond the Bride of Frankenstein: Monsters and Other Fearsome Women

Beyond the Bride of Frankenstein: Monsters and Other Fearsome Women

Horror Studies Webinar Series presents: Panel featuring Melanie Anderson, Lisa Kroger, and Lisa Morton. Join us on Monday, January 25 at 7- 8 pm.
The Revolution They Remember title screen

The Revolution They Remember

You are invited to the virtual premiere of the feature-length documentary The Revolution They Remember on Thursday, November 12, 2020 from 7–9:30 p.m. View the trailer here!

Registration is required. Click here for more information about the film and to register for the premiere.

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